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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation.

The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. 

Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break.


Grit structure

Top

 

The conventional or singular grit type

The compact or composite grit type

The geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™


 

Grit type

 Top

 

 

Aluminium oxide

Aluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.

 

 

Silicon carbide

This grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.

 

 

Zirconium oxide

The zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).

 

 

Ceramic grit

Ceramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.

Grit designation

 Top
 In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation.
 Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.
  
[format] => 1 [safe] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[view] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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back button

 
The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation.

The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. 

Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break.


Grit structure

Top

 

The conventional or singular grit type

The compact or composite grit type

The geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™


 

Grit type

 Top

 

 

Aluminium oxide

Aluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.

 

 

Silicon carbide

This grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.

 

 

Zirconium oxide

The zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).

 

 

Ceramic grit

Ceramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.

Grit designation

 Top
 In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation.
 Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.
  
[format] => 1 [safe] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation.

The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. 

Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break.


Grit structure

Top

 

The conventional or singular grit type

The compact or composite grit type

The geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™


 

Grit type

 Top

 

 

Aluminium oxide

Aluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.

 

 

Silicon carbide

This grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.

 

 

Zirconium oxide

The zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).

 

 

Ceramic grit

Ceramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.

Grit designation

 Top
 In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation.
 Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.
  
[format] => 1 [safe] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation.

The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. 

Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break.


Grit structure

Top

 

The conventional or singular grit type

The compact or composite grit type

The geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™


 

Grit type

 Top

 

 

Aluminium oxide

Aluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.

 

 

Silicon carbide

This grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.

 

 

Zirconium oxide

The zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).

 

 

Ceramic grit

Ceramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.

Grit designation

 Top
 In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation.
 Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.
  
[format] => 1 [safe] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_page_body_top [#title] => Body top [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => hidden [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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 The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation. The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break. Grit structureTop The conventional or singular grit typeThe compact or composite grit typeThe geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™ Grit type Top  Aluminium oxideAluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.  Silicon carbideThis grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.   Zirconium oxideThe zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).   Ceramic gritCeramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.Grit designation Top In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation. Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.  

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Grit

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The stock removal capacity of the grit is determined by its shape, structure, hardness, toughness, fragility, heat-resistance and orientation.

The hardness of a grit is usually determined according to the scale of Mohs and/or the scale of Knoop. On the opposite page you will find a comparative scale of the most important grit types. 

Besides its hardness, the toughness or fragility of the grit is possibly even more important for the evaluation of a grit efficiency in a specific application. The more fragile the grit is, the less pressure is required to break it and create new, sharp cutting edges. Less pressure leads to lower heat generation and an improved level of finish. A higher level of fragility is, in turn, responsible for a shorter lifespan. In the list on the next page, you can read which grit types are the quickest to break.


Grit structure

Top

 

The conventional or singular grit type

The compact or composite grit type

The geometrically composed grit type Trizact™ / Norax™


 

Grit type

 Top

 

 

Aluminium oxide

Aluminium oxide has a simple, crystal structure, and is, on average, hard and abrasion-resistant, but it is less sharp than other grit. Aluminium oxide is less tough than zirconium oxide and therefore requires less pressure. Heat generation can rise significantly when this grit is used. It is therefore better to use aluminium oxide with metals that are heat- resistant.

 

 

Silicon carbide

This grit is definitely the hardest and sharpest in the range, but it is also very fragile. This rather limits its lifespan. On the other hand, due to its hard and sharp properties, it is ideally suited for working titanium and cobalt alloys, such as Inconel. Silicon carbide also provides very good results on glass and stone. Due to its specific properties, little pressure is required to work efficiently with this grit type. As a result, little heat is generated. Silicon carbide is an ideal partner for working heat sensitive materials such as most non-ferrous materials, copper, brass, bronze, aluminium, etc., but also plastics, rubber, chipboards and MDF.

 

 

Zirconium oxide

The zirconium oxide grit is medium hard, but is very sharp, very tough and has a good resistance against heat. This makes it the ideal grit for heavy machining under heavy to very heavy pressure. Due to the heavy pressure and under the influence of heat, the grit breaks open and this constantly creates new cutting edges. This prevents the grit from becoming blunt prematurely. The zirconium oxide grit achieves its best performance with coarser grit (24-80).

 

 

Ceramic grit

Ceramic grit has a micro-crystalline structure and is hard and tough, but at the same time it is also sharp. Due to the micro-structure, the grit already starts to break under low to medium pressure. The new cutting edges make sure the machining capacity of the grit diminishes little during the belt’s lifespan. The properties of the ceramic grit can, however, change in an adverse way under the influence of heat. For this reason, active grinding ingredients preventing heat build-up are often added to this grit.

Grit designation

 Top
 In Europe, the grit size of flexible abrasive material is indicated according to the Fepa standard. Fepa is the European Federation of Manufacturers of Grinding and Cutting Materials. Each grit designation is preceded by the letter “P”. In the United States, the ANSI or Cami standard is generally used. Japan follows the Jis designation.
 Besides that, there are a number of other designations like the APEX, for structured grit types like the Trizact™; the various designations for the Micro-Mesh and the Micron designation. In order to obtain a clear picture, please find in the conversion chart an overview and comparison of the most frequently used grades.